(tumblr user applesandaces has a strikingly similar tutorial going and they’re much better at explaining than i am! ; 3; if you’d like to read theirs, it’s really great!)

Jack Frost Staff Tutorial!

My apologies for missing a few photos! I forgot I was doing a tutorial during the process… But, this should suffice! O v O

MATERIALS NEEDED

  • Three or four 2’ 3/4” PVC pipe sections (you’ll have extra, that’s good!)
  • Two 3/4” PVC couplers
  • One 45-degree 3/4” PVC elbows
  • One 90-degree 3/4” PVC elbow
  • Two 3/4” PVC caps
  • PVC pipe cutters (i used branch cutters OTL)
  • PVC glue (“Red Hot Blue Glue”)
  • Painter’s tape (the BIG rolls! PREFERABLY TAN or BROWN)
  • “Rust-oleum” brown spray paint in SATIN FINISH
  • "Rust-oleum" Clear MATTE finish spray
  • "Rust-oleum" Brown Stone Texture spray paint (optional)
  • White paint pen (IE Sharpie thin-tip)
  • White acrylic paint
  • Light blue shimmer acrylic paint
  • paint brushes/paper towels

(The total cost is somewhere around $20.)
This WILL be really long so please click the read more!!!

BASIC ASSEMBLY

  1. The BASE of the staff, at its tallest point (the bottom of the crook) is going to be around right under your nose or chin, depending on how large you want your crook to be. Note: this will change depending on how tall you are! For myself, I attached two 2’ 3/4” pipes and added an extension of about eight inches. (I’m 5’3”). Attach these pieces with the COUPLERS and place a CAP on the bottom.
  2. Your crook sizes are as follows: A= 10” B= 8” C= 7” D= 8” These can totally vary if you want your crook to look differently. Play around with sizes, and if you mess up, you have extra pipe. Cut these with your PVC cutters or, if you wanna be brazen, with branch cutters like I did. Branch cutters will cut just fine, but please be EXTREMELY CAREFUL with this step.
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  4. The BASE will connect to A with a 45 degree elbow, A to B with a 45 degree elbow, B to C with a 45 degree elbow, and C to D with a 90 degree elbow. Place a CAP on the end of D.
  5. Glue those suckers together using PVC glue and make sure that the pieces of the crook all stay in the same direction or you’ll have a wonky staff. DO NOT LET THIS GLUE TOUCH YOUR FINGERS AFTER IT HAS TOUCHED PIPE. IT’LL BURN THE SHIT OUT OF YOU FOR REAL. ALSO DO THIS OUTSIDE OR YOU’LL BE HIGH AF. I recommend wearing gloves while doing this! (I don’t have any pictures of this step because I kind of… glued mine… in the nighttime…) Let this glue dry for about fifteen minutes to half an hour.

Now you have your basic frame! Time to start texturing.

TEXTURING

  1. Wrap a base layer of painter’s tape around the staff to make sure you don’t miss any piping.
  2. Start at the bottom and work your way up, wrapping the tape loosely and scrunching it tightly with your hands to get the texture you want.image
  3. Add more or less where you want there to be thicker or thinner parts of the “branches” since the staff is made of wood.
  4. For the notches near the top of my staff, I balled up tape or rolled up pieces of tape and taped those suckers down as tightly as I could.
  5. If there are sticky pieces of tape facing up, it’s not a big deal. Mistakes are good! The more texture, the better, since the paint will tend to smooth some of it out. Keep taping until you’re happy with what you have.image

Here’s a comparison of my finished staff and my friend’s unfinished (PLEASE NOTE: hers is BIGGER THAN MINE and her pipes are sized way differently!)

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ALTERNATIVELY: You could also paper mache your staff if that’s what you’re comfortable with! I would have, but I didn’t have the materials to do so. Just note that doing so will require a longer time (to dry).

Awesome! You now have your base shape of your staff. Now for painting.

PAINTING

  1. Bring your staff outside. Seriously. Set it on something no one will get mad at you for getting paint all over. Like some cardboard.
  2. Paint! Don’t put too much paint on one area, or it’ll take way longer to dry. If you’re impatient like me, this will SUCK.
  3. Make sure to get inside all of the little crevices to cover ALL of the blue (or tan, whatever color of painter’s tape you used. I used blue. I probably should have recommended tan. Whoops).
  4. Wait for that sucker to dry.
  5. Detailing! (I brought mine back inside for this step.) I had a white sharpie paint pen to make little frost details, and white acrylic to dab some on with paper towels and napkins. The light blue acrylic paint was used to add the swirly details. Concentrate the frost to where you’re going to be holding it! This is super crucial to having an awesomely accurate staff.
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  7. OPTIONAL: there’s this textured spraypaint by Rust-oleum called “Stone” and it looks kind of barky. I think it looks cool when used sparingly, so you can see if you like that! If you’re happy with how your staff looks already, it’s not totally necessary.
  8. Spray the matte finishing spray over it, preferably a few coats, just in case!

Aaaaaaand you’re done! I hope you’re as happy with how your staff turned out as I am with mine! If I was too vague or unclear or you’d like more details, please send me a message and I’d be happy to answer you.

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(Also, I’ll be trying to get some not-shitty not-cell-phone photos up soon, along with my entire cosplay! O v O)